As any condominium association that has had to deal with one knows, the mechanic’s lien is a powerful hammer to force payment to a contractor. Once it is filed in the land records, a lien often makes it impossible for condominium unit owners to sell or refinance, costs the condominium association time and money (in legal fees) to defend, and generally embroils the condominium association in much unwanted litigation.

The good news is that removing a mechanic’s lien can be easier than you might think. Filing a lien, especially on a large condominium association, is not an easy task. The contractor has to conduct a title search and bring down for each condominium unit. And the Virginia mechanic’s lien statute is full of traps for the unwary. Because the Virginia courts view mechanic’s liens as "purely a creature of statute" and "in derogation of the common law," the mechanic’s lien statute is strictly construed. That is, it must be followed meticulously, or the lien will be invalid. Thus, painstaking analysis is required to ensure that the lien complies with Title 43 of the Virginia Code.

As a result, mechanic’s lien claims can be very defensible. Aside from the critical timing issues, which affect all mechanic’s liens (they must be filed within 90 days, and may only include work done within 150 days, of completion of the work), there are certain property identity and allocation issues that are specific to condominiums.

Here are some important points to remember:


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LeClairRyan attorneys Doug Cuthbertson and Nicole Pszczolkowski were recently selected to give a presentation at the upcoming 2012 Conference and Expo of the Washington Metro Chapter of CAI. Their presentation, entitled "We’ve Been Sued! Now What?" will feature a discussion of practical tips for board members, community managers, and others on how to avoid litigation

LeClairRyan attorney Will Sleeth was recently quoted in a Virginia Lawyers Weekly magazine article reporting on a Virginia state court case in which the trial judge awarded homeowners their attorney’s fees for prevailing in their suit against their property owners’ association. The article (subscription required) discussed how the ruling was a significant decision in interpreting

 

In a post several months ago, we noted the General Assembly’s adoption of amendments to the Property Owners’ Association Act and the Condominium Act that address associations’ ability to regulate the display of the United States flag.  As we reported then, the amended Virginia Code sections (Va. Code § 55-513.1 [POAs] and § 55-79.75:2 [Condos]) follow the language of the federal Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005, signed into law on July 24, 2006. It provides that no association (POA or condominium) shall prohibit an owner from displaying the U.S. flag on his own property (lot or unit) as long as the display conforms to federal law, rule or custom.  You can find the official rules governing flag display in Title 4, Chapter 1 at the U.S. House of Representatives’ website at http://uscode.house.gov/uscode-cgi/fastweb.exe?search.


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The other week the Wall Street Journal published an interesting and somewhat amusing article about the latest trend in upscale neighborhoods: renting a goat as a means to trim a yard and eliminate weeds.

Apparently renting a goat constitutes an environmentally-friendly "carbon-emission-free" way to trim grass. The Journal reports that: "Prices can range from

The General Assembly recently adopted amendments to the Property Owners’ Association Act and the Condominium Act that address associations’ ability to regulate the display of the United States flag.  The amended Virginia Code sections follow the language of the U.S. Code (The Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005), which is the federal

Did you happen to miss last month’s Fair Housing Act webinar put on by LeClairRyan’s Liz White and Brian Muse? No problem — the webinar is available for viewing at your convenience. Just click here to be linked to the blog’s "Webinars" section to find links to this webinar as well as all of

On Wednesday, May 19th, LeClairRyan’s Community Association Industry Team will be hosting a free webinar entitled "The Fair Housing Act: Keeping your Community Association in Compliance and Out of Court.”

On Wednesday the 19th from noon to 1 P.M. EST, attorneys Liz White and Brian Muse will provide an overview of the

On April 17, 2010, LeClairRyan’s Community Association Team will be presenting a free seminar in Williamsburg, Virginia, entitled "Advanced Legal Aspects of Community Associations."

We invite you to join attorneys Liz White, Dan Quarles, Megan Scanlon, and Will Sleeth as they will discuss four topics that board members and managers frequently encounter as