Before sending your email to us, please note and understand the following:

This website provides general information about LeClairRyan, its practice areas and professional staff. It is not intended to provide you with legal advice with respect to a matter that you may have.

Until such time as LeClairRyan has resolved all potential conflicts of interest in accepting your representation and has agreed to be engaged as your legal counsel, you are not represented by LeClairRyan or any of its attorneys and have not become a client of the Firm.

Sending this email or otherwise contacting LeClairRyan does not create an attorney-client relationship. By sending information to us, you are not creating an attorney-client relationship, and no disclosure by you before this firm agrees to represent you will prohibit this firm from representing any person or entity adverse to you.

Only if, and after, LeClairRyan has confirmed to you that it is willing and able to represent you should you, send the Firm any information or documents that you consider private or confidential. Such information will not be treated as private, confidential or otherwise protected from disclosure until LeClairRyan has confirmed that it is able and willing to represent you.

If you choose to ignore this warning and submit any information that you believe or otherwise assert to be confidential or privileged, then by clicking on the “Accept” button, you agree that your submission will not preclude LeClairRyan from representing a client in a matter adverse to you where that information could be used against you.
Accept Cancel
OK

Rent-A-Goat: The Latest Craze and the New Challenge for HOAs

 

The other week the Wall Street Journal published an interesting and somewhat amusing article about the latest trend in upscale neighborhoods: renting a goat as a means to trim a yard and eliminate weeds.

Apparently renting a goat constitutes an environmentally-friendly "carbon-emission-free" way to trim grass. The Journal reports that: "Prices can range from $200 a day for a dozen goats to upward of $1,000 for larger herds of 100 or more."

If this trend catches on, it will pose some unique issues for associations throughout Virginia. Many associations will likely look skeptically upon goat trailers carting goats smack into the middle of their neighborhood as they’re let loose to chew-up the grass throughout a lot. Many associations’ covenants contain restrictions on maintaining or raising cattle, livestock, and non-domesticated animals on lots, but those covenants may not explicitly prohibit those animals from coming on to a lot for short periods of time. Therefore, if an association encounters this situation, it may want to consider amending its covenants to prohibit non-domesticated animals from coming on to lots.

So if you serve on the board of an association and wake up tomorrow morning to the sight of a flock of goats roaming around a yard, it might be smart to try to have the association address the situation through the covenants rather than having neighbors become angry with each other and try to "chew each other out".

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://www.virginiacommunityassociationlaw.com/admin/trackback/220228
Comments (0) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Send To A Friend Use this form to send this entry to a friend via email.